Blade Runner

1982

Sci-Fi / Thriller

181
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 91%
IMDb Rating 8.2 10 0 456412

Synopsis


Uploaded By: LINUS
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Director

Cast

as Rick Deckard
as Roy Batty
as Rachael
720p
702.41 MB
1280*720
English
R
23.976
01 hr 57 min
P/S 5,190 / 5,045

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Joel Hoff (joelhoff) 10 / 10

A compelling, thematically-deep SF film

This is truly one of the greatest science fiction films ever made, one that requires a thinking viewer in order to understand and appreciate it. The director's cut is the recommended one to see as it omits a somewhat distracting narration and avoids an unnecessary Hollywood-style ending that is at odds with the rest of the film's tone.

A true science fiction story or film is about ideas, not spaceship battles, futuristic gadgets, or weird creatures. "Blade Runner" fully qualifies as this in its examination of the impact of technology on human society, existence, and the very nature of humanity itself. These themes are set in a fairly basic detective story that moves slowly but gradually builds power as the viewer is immersed in a dystopian futuristic Los Angeles.

Harrison Ford fans accustomed to the normally dynamic roles that he plays may be dissatisfied with the seemingly lifeless lead character that he portrays here as the replicant-hunting detective known as a "blade runner". They should be, for this dissatisfaction is part of the film experience, part of the dehumanized existence in the story's setting. However, as the story unfolds, we see Ford's character, Rick Deckard, slowly come alive again and recover some humanity while pursing four escaped replicants.

The replicants, genetically-engineered human cyborgs, that Deckard must hunt down and kill are in many ways more alive than Deckard himself initially. Their escape from an off-world colony has an explicit self-directed purpose, whereas Deckard's life appears to have none other than his job, one that he has tried to give up. By some standards, Deckard and the replicants have thin character development. However, this is a deeply thematic and philosophical film, and as such the characters are the tools of the story's themes. Each character reflects some aspect of humanity or human existence, but they lack others, for each is broken in ways that reflect the broken society in which they live and were conceived/created.

There are several dramatic moments involving life-and-death struggles, but most of these are more subdued than in a normal detective story plot. The film's power is chiefly derived through its stunning visual imagery of a dark futuristic cityscape and its philosophical themes.

Among the themes explored are the following: - The dehumanization of people through a society shaped by technological and capitalistic excess. - The roles of creator and creation, their mutual enslavement, and their role reversal, i.e., the creation's triumph over its creator. - The nature of humanity itself: emotions, memory, purpose, desire, cruelty, technological mastery of environment and universe, mortality, death, and more. - Personal identity and self-awareness. - The meaning of existence.

If you are not someone who naturally enjoys contemplating such themes, the film's brilliance may be lost on you. The climax involves a soliloquy that brings many of the themes together in a simple yet wonderfully poetic way. Anyone who "gets" the film should be moved by this; others will sadly miss the point and may prefer watching some mindless action flick instead.

"Blade Runner" is a masterpiece that deserves recognition and long remembrance in film history.

Reviewed by Flagrant-Baronessa 10 / 10

A glorious, timeless nightmare

Dark, deep, uncertain, unsettling ? imagine the most beautiful nightmare you've ever had ? this is Blade Runner (1982).

Ridley Scott's Blade Runner is a brilliantly crafted science fiction film that not only touches upon, but bravely plunges into deep philosophical questions, making it simply ten times more important than any film of its genre. I love it not only for the initial feeling it gives, but because of its perseverance ? none of the visuals, themes or technology feel dated but as deep, gripping and current as ever. It is timeless beauty with huge doses of emotion.

Set in 2019 Los Angeles, Blade Runner zooms in on the eerily-lit, urban streets of the city and follows Richard Deckard ? superbly played by Harrison Ford who brings an exquisite moral ambiguity to his character ? a special policeman who tracks down and terminates artificially-created humans called replicants, who have escaped from an Off-World colony and made their way to earth and need to be stopped. The things Deckard encounters on his detective journey raise many philosophical questions like: Who is really a replicant? Are replicants really bad? If replicants are bad, when why did we go to such lengths with our technology to create them? Are replicants really humans? Is Deckard a hero? This truly is a film that demands subsequent discussion and its ambiguous ending leave a haunting and eerie feeling.

In spite of a rich glaze of science fiction and futurism coating this adventure, there are distinct film noir elements present ? primarily in the bluish haze that the film is seen through and its gritty urban atmosphere. Whoever thought of this combination is a genius. Since it is all about technology, it fits then that Blade Runner features a ridiculous amount of product placement, especially from Atari. In any other film, this would have felt out-of-place but here it is simply perfect. The score by Vangelis is strangely gripping when combined with the striking cinematography of the film.

Blade Runner deserves credit, celebration and remembrance for it is simply an excellent film.

10 out of 10 (and I don't just throw this grade out like SOME people)

Reviewed by krishnaraj613 10 / 10

Science Fiction Epic

I have an interest in science fiction films and TV programmes. I like shows like (the original) Star Wars trilogy, (most of) the Star Trek films, as well as Star Trek TV series (Voyager for modern times,preferably, as it had the least number of useless episodes), etc. In my experience, most SF material turns out to be distilled garbage. Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey' was a masterpiece. I am not hesitant to say that I blatantly dislike Spielberg's definition of SF- ET, Close Encounters, & (worst of all) War Of The Worlds. Neither do I appreciate any 'Alien' film apart from R Scott's 1979 original (although Alien2 was OK)-Alien vs Pred is a disgrace not only to all genres, but to the film industry itself. So when I heard of Blade Runner on the net, I wondered; what could be so good about this film? I have HBO,Cinemax, Star Movies- yet this film has never been shown. So, I got myself the Director's Cut at the local video store. I watched it once. Then I re-watched it two days later. My verdict: This film is fantastic.

It is one of the greatest films ever made, on par with 2001: A Space Odyssey. Upon 1st viewing, new audiences may be bewildered. One anticipates a futuristic run-of-the-mill 80's shoot-em-up (in the like of Outland,say). What you get is a film so deep that it is difficult to grasp the 1st time. There is so much symbolism, introverts and questions that I was left stunned. The film is hauntingly beautiful, and I doubt that these screen landscapes could be reproduced today as well as they were here. The plot centres around the question of humanity- something we take for granted. It is not an auctioneer, which was probably what audiences expected when they walked into theatres in the 80s, causing the film to fail commercially. Blade Runner is not for the adrenaline junkie, nor for those who like flashy gadgets and bright explosions, with a healthy Hollywood-made dose of convincing storyline spoon-fed for their satisfaction.

The film is set in the apocalyptic, suggestively post-war future Earth, where there seems to be a lag in technology. Perhaps there was a war which ravaged the world, forcing humans to migrate (the cramped cultural richness of LA), and rebuild, explaining the retro technology. 6 'Criminal' Nexus 6 replicates (genetically engineered humanoids), hijack a ship and come to Earth seeking their maker. These slaves(machines/automatons// regard them as anything which has been created by Man to lessen his burden) have developed emotions, and they fear death for they cherish their memories (Think robots weeping over photographs). Their cause: They want a longer life, they want to experience more, they want to be... human.

Enter Rick Deckard, Blade Runner. His job: kill trespassing replicates; Kill living, breathing humanoids composed of flesh and blood who only have 4 years to live out their miserable lives, seeking haven on Earth rather than serving as slaves in mining outposts on Mars. Kill? Murder seems more appropriate. But that's his job. replicates which trespass are a hazard. These 6 replicates have killed 23 people and hijacked a ship. They have to be killed, right? If you're planning to take sides in this film, you will be pleasantly if not unnervingly surprised. There are no sides. There is no good and evil. Harrison Ford plays the reluctant, burned out Blade Runner very well. His character is drab and dull, as it was meant to be; look at him in the Spinner on the way to Tyrell corporation- pure boredom. He hates his job. If there were any narration, it Should sound dull and uninteresting, reflecting his character. Rutger Hauer gives the greatest performance of his career (so far) in this film, playing Roy Batty, Replicant 'project manager'. He dominates the later part of the film. He is cold, stiff and evil, but in the end speech, one of the Greatest endings I have ever seen, his performance alone makes this film a Classic. The ending is beautiful, and the score by Vangelis is perfect.

All in all, the film is excellent. Well directed by Ridley Scott, innovative and stunning imagery underlined by Vangelis' superb score, and plenty to think about (on your own- no spoon feeding). Check out the trivia for this film; scientists voted it better than 2001:A Space Odyssey. Is the quest for humanity a crime? Find out for yourself. Blade Runner is a Must-Watch, and a Must-Have film.

My rating: 8.9 / 10 Thank you for your time. Kris

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